Tag Archives: podcast

MTRB #20 – Robert Groene

Robert Groene is an Associate Professor and the Director of Music Therapy at UMKC. He received his BS, MA, and PhD degrees from the University of Minnesota. He is a past professor at The University of Iowa and Wartburg College. Dr. Groene is an active teacher researcher, clinician and research editorial board member in local, regional, national, and international venues. He was a past nominee for President-Elect of the American Music Therapy Association, Past President of the AMTA Midwestern Region, former Co-Chair of the AMTA Standards of Clinical Practice, and a recipient of the AMTA Service Award.

He is a former Interim Associate Dean of Academic Affairs at the Conservatory, a recipient of the Muriel McBrien Kauffman Conservatory Excellence in Teaching Award, and a recipient of the Kauffman Conservatory Service Award. Dr. Groene is a Leadership Fellow of the UM System and Co-Chair of the 2020 Task force Faculty/Staff/Student Climate Subcommittee. His current research interests include the efficacy of music therapy concerning neurologic music therapy, curriculum, imagery, dementia, road rage, dental fears, and aging in community.

Music for this podcast is “Missouri Joe” by Sophie Tucker from the album Edison Amberol Record: 716

20150218-2_viega-michael_0029Michael Viega, Ph.D., LCAT, MT-BC, is an Assistant Professor of music therapy at the State University of New York (SUNY), New Paltz and a Fellow in the Association of Music and Imagery. He has published and presented on a wide range of topics such as Hip Hop and music therapy (which can be found in a 2016 edition of Music Therapy Perspectives), arts-based research methodologies, therapeutic songwriting, and adverse childhood experiences and adolescent development. He serves on the editorial board for Music Therapy Perspectives and Voices: A World Forum for Music Therapy. He is currently the President-elect of the Mid-Atlantic Region of the American Music Therapy Association (MAR-AMTA) and on a national level, serves on the AMTA Assembly of Delegates.

Music for this podcast is “Every Door Must Open” from Dr. Viega’s Soundcloud page.

joyallenJoy Allen, PhD, MT-BC is an accomplished clinician, researcher, and educator. She has extensive experience working with medical patients where she focuses on psychological health, pain management, and the family system. She is particularly passionate about working with individuals and families facing chronic illnesses, including cancer. Her current research interests include quantitative analysis of the effects of music therapy on the psychological health of medical patients, Guided Imagery & Music with medical patients, as well as medical music therapy theory development and efficacy research. She is currently chair of the music therapy department at Berklee College of Music.

Music is Jimniclucl by Kid Romance from the album Boston Hassle Comp

MTRB #15 – Claire Ghetti

ghetti_bw Claire Ghetti is part of the Grieg Academy Music Therapy Research Centre (GAMUT) and Associate Professor of Music Therapy at The Grieg Academy, University of Bergen, Norway. As a music therapist and child life specialist, she has extensive clinical experience with children and adults in intensive and long-term care medical settings. Claire has particular interest in exploring the ways in which music therapy may promote emotional-approach coping and buffer against traumatization in intensive medical contexts. She has conducted research and theoretical work in the area of music therapy as emotional-approach coping and as procedural support for invasive medical procedures. Current research includes evaluating the use of music therapy to improve quality of relation in preterm infant/parent interactions in order to promote optimal neurodevelopmental outcomes and improve parental psychological health. Along with colleagues at GAMUT, Claire is also researching the implementation of music therapy in substance use treatment settings in Norway, and she has published on the topic of music therapy and harm reduction. Claire has served on the editorial boards of the Journal of Music Therapy, Voices: A World Forum for Music Therapy, and Music Therapy Perspectives, and has authored journal articles and book chapters on various research methodologies and clinical approaches. She holds a Ph.D. in music education/music therapy with a minor in health psychology from the University of Kansas.

Elizabeth Stegemöller_ISU_Headshot“Music is the medicine of the mind.” (John A. Logan) To date, little is known about the neural underpinnings of music and its therapeutic application. As a music therapist, Dr. Elizabeth Stegemöller has witnessed several intriguing experiences where patients with a neurological disorder have overcome a debilitating condition through music. It is these experiences that have motivated her research goals. Dr. Stegemöller earned her bachelor’s degrees in Music Therapy and Biology with a minor in Chemistry from the University of Missouri – Kansas City in 2001. Following her degrees, she worked as a clinical music therapist before returning to graduate school earning her doctoral degree in Neuroscience at Northwestern University in 2010. Following the completion of her graduate degree, Dr. Stegemöller completed a postdoctoral fellowship in the Department of Neurology and Department of Applied Physiology and Kinesiology at the University of Florida. She joined Iowa State University in 2013 as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Kinesiology. Dr. Stegemöller’s main research focus is to understand the neurophysiology associated with the therapeutic effect of music on axial impairments in persons with Parkinson’s disease. She currently has multiple projects examining the effects of music on speech, swallow, repetitive finger movements, and gait in persons with PD. Dr. Stegemöller has received funding and has over 25 publications in her young career. In addition, Dr. Stegemöller is highly active in the Parkinson’s Action Network advocating for Parkinson’s disease research. Dr. Stegemöller is very passionate about her work and hopes that through her research and advocacy effort, she can contribute to the development of new and innovated therapies that demonstrate effectiveness at targeting PD symptoms often not improved with medication.

MTRB #10: Ed Roth

This podcast is the first in our feature on members of the editorial board of the Journal of Music Therapy. We have pestered friends and colleagues of ours to be on the podcast to talk about their research and also give some tips from their perspectives as reviewers and editors of music therapy research.

Ed Roth is a sought after presenter regionally, nationally and internationally, most recently at the University of Queensland (Brisbane, Australia), National Institutes of Health (Bethesda, Maryland), Ramon Llull University (Barcelona, Spain) and Oxford University (England). His publications appear in music therapy and science or health related journals including the Nordic Journal of Music Therapy 13(1) (2004), The Case Manager: The Official Journal of the Medical Case Management Society of America (May-June 2004), the Journal for the Professional Counselor (2007), and Perceptual and Motor Skills (2008).

Roth has worked in several clinical settings with clients in various neurological, physical and psychiatric diagnostic categories. While working as a teaching and research assistant at the Center for Biomedical Research in Music at Colorado State University, he led music therapy and counseling groups for adolescents diagnosed with post-traumatic stress and acute anxiety disorders from Columbine High School in Littleton, Colo. Prior clinical experiences also include service as a music therapist at Blythedale Children′s Hospital (Westchester, N.Y.), the University of Michigan Medical Center (Ann Arbor, Mich.), and Bronson and Borgess Medical Centers (Kalamazoo, Mich.).

Roth is a member of the American Music Therapy Association and the New York Academy of Sciences, and is certified by the Certification Board for Music Therapists.

Recently, Roth chaired a pre-conference institute in San Diego at the American Music Therapy Association′s annual national conference. The institute, titled Clinical Neuromusicology: The Neuroscience of Music from Perception to Clinical Practice, featured some of the world’s most prominent neuroscientists and music therapists and drew a large audience from a broad field of disciplines.

In August 2010, Roth presented a synthesis of papers investigating the effects of music on motor functioning at the inaugural conference for the International Society of Clinical Neuromusicology in Salzburg, Austria.

MTRB#6: Julian O’Kelly

JulianOKellyWe recorded this podcast on January 15, 2015 (yes, 1/15/15) with a wonderful guest, Dr. Julian O’Kelly. He has worked in neuro-rehabilitation and palliative care as a music therapy clinician, manager, educationalist and researcher for the last fifteen years and regularly presents at international symposia and conferences. In addition to his research work, Julian chairs the scientific committee for the forthcoming international conference at the Royal Hospital for Neurodisability: ‘Music Therapy Advances in Neurodisability II’, and is associate editor of a special research topic for the open access publication ‘Frontiers in Human Neuroscience’ titled ‘Dialogues in music therapy and music neuroscience: collaborative understanding driving clinical advances.’

Publication on music therapy assessment of disorders of consciousness

Frontiers in Neuroscience: “Dialogues”

Neurophysiological and behavioral responses to music therapy (article abstract)

Link to the JISCMAIL MT Neurology Network

MTRB#5: Results and Data Analysis

Blast from the past – here’s an episode that we DID manage to save from the “old days” about results and data analysis. It was a “Part 2” portion of a three part series on writing up a manuscript.

Comments? Questions? Join the discussion at the Music Therapy Research Blog, leave a comment and a rating for us on iTunes, on the MTRB Facebook page, or tweet us at @ablythel and @knightmtbc.

MTRB#4: William Davis

Dr. Bill Davis joins the MTRB podcast to dive in to historical research angles and a discussion about the AMTA archive project. Dr. Davis is a (sort of!) retired Professor of Music Therapy at Colorado State University and archivist for the American Music Therapy Association. He is a Lifetime Achievement Award winner with the AMTA and has several publications in various international journals for music therapy, mainly focusing on historical aspects of the profession.

Comments? Questions? Join the discussion at the Music Therapy Research Blog, leave a comment and a rating for us on iTunes, on the MTRB Facebook page, or tweet us at @ablythel and @knightmtbc.

MTRB#3: Bill Matney

Episode #3 is a distance interview with Bill Matney. Bill received his master’s degree at Texas Women’s University, was a clinician in the Lewisville Independent School District in Texas, and is currently a doctoral student in music therapy at the University of Kansas. As part of Music Therapy Drumming, Bill teamed up with Carolyn Koebel, Mike Marcionetti, and Kalani to create a series of instructional experiences for music therapists who wish to improve their clinical and musical skills involving live percussion playing. He has been published in Music Therapy Perspectives and discusses his research processes, past, present, and future. Buy “Tataku: The Use of Percussion in Music Therapy” from Sarsen Publishing.

Comments? Questions? Join the discussion at the Music Therapy Research Blog, leave a comment and a rating for us on iTunes, on the MTRB Facebook page, or tweet us at @ablythel and @knightmtbc.